All posts by mrdustindavis

I am a husband, a father, a gamer, sci-fi nerd, veteran, blogger, and above all else a passionate follower of my Lord and savior, Jesus Christ.

Music Man

“You have turned for me my mourning into dancing; you have loosed my sackcloth and clothed me with gladness, that my glory may sing your praise and not be silent. O LORD my God, I will give thanks to you forever!” (Psalm 30:11-12 ESV).

I love music. I usually have some kind of music playing in the background of our home while we go about our daily routine. The type of music depends on time of day, what we’re doing, and the general “mood” of everyone around. It’s interesting to see the different styles of music that my two small children enjoy. My daughter likes to sing and dance to folk and bluegrass while my son enjoys pop and hip-hop (he has recently discovered Lecrae).

King David was also a music man being proficient in playing several different instruments. I’ve found myself spending more and more time in the Psalms, usually starting my quiet time with Psalms and prayer. King David poured his heart out in the Psalms, he held nothing back. He showed us times of praise and worship such as Psalm 9 that starts, “I give thanks to the LORD with my whole heart; I will recount all of your wonderful deeds,” (Psalm 9:1 ESV). Then in the very next chapter sings, “Why, O LORD, do you stand far away? Why do you hide yourself in times of trouble?” (Psalm 10:1 ESV). King David showed us his highs and lows. Times of rejoicing, and times of trouble. Singing, “The LORD is my strength and my shield; in him my heart trusts, and I am helped; my heart exults, and with my song I give thanks to him,” in Psalm 28:7, to crying out, “O LORD, rebuke me not in your anger, nor discipline me in your wrath! For your arrows have sunk into me, and your hand has come down on me,” in Psalm 38:1-2.

God called King David, “a man after my heart, who will do all my will” (Acts 13:22 ESV) yet David still had the ups and downs that come with life. He experienced joy and sadness. Great rejoicing and times of equally great grieving. Times of blessing and times of burden. Yet, through it all, his faith never waivered. His trust in the Lord never ceased.

When I look at the life of King David, the songs he wrote, the life he lived, his blessing and his heartache, it encourages me in my own walk with the Lord. David shows us that as Christians we are not always promised an easy life. We are not always promised that things are going to go our way. But he also shows us how to trust the Lord in those dark times. He shows us that it’s okay to cry out to God in times of need. That just because we experience the hardships of living in a fallen world, our Heavenly Father still loves us.

I pray that you would spend time in the Psalms. Spend time worshiping the Lord through the songs of David. Experience his sadness and his joy. The Psalms are showing me how to walk through difficult times trusting in the Lord. They are showing me how to worship God, how to come to Him with the hard questions in hard times. I promise you, God can handle the tough questions. But most importantly, the Psalms teach to trust the Lord. To truly have faith in Him.

“Weeping may tarry for the night, but joy comes with the morning,” (Psalm 30:5 ESV).



Back Row Believer

Growing up in the southeastern part of the United States, I heard the term “back row Baptist” more than a few times. It was said as an insult to people who either show up late to church and leave early or about someone who simply comes to church out of obligation instead of worship. For some reason this statement has been on my mind all morning, and the more I think about it, the more it bothers me.

As believers in Christ, we are called to spread the love of God to our brothers and sisters in the world. Our job as Christians is not to judge them because their timing is a little off or which pew they choose to sit in, but to be thankful that they came to church in the first place. To encourage them to grow in their knowledge of the bible and their understanding of the love of God.

I have so many friends and family members that desperately need to hear the gospel, yet refuse to set foot in a church. When I ask them why they don’t come, the answer is almost unanimous, they feel judged by the people in the church. They feel like they don’t measure up to the standard that we have put on what a Christian should look and act like. They feel like they don’t fit in. That’s not on them, that’s on us.

We are the true “back row believers”. We have, like the Pharisees, rejected the commandment of God in order to establish our own traditions (Mark 7:9). We have rejected the new commandment from Jesus to love one another (John 13:34). Jesus followed this new commandment with the statement, “By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another,” (John 13:35). People will know us by our love. Not by the way we dress, the way we talk, or where we sit, but by our love for one another.

This Sunday when you walk into your church, take a seat in the back a have a look around. Does your congregation look like it would welcome people “from every nation, from all tribes”? (Revelation 7:9). Or is it a “cookie cutter” congregation, where everyone looks the same. Jesus has called us to reach the world. Not just the part of the world that looks and talks like us, the entire world.

“Do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly,” (Romans 12:16 ESV).

We are called to live in unity through love in Christ Jesus to the glory of God. This is not an option. “For God shows no partiality, ” (Romans 2:11 ESV).

God shows no partiality, Jesus has no favorites, and neither can we. We must love all with the same love that was shown to us through Jesus Christ. Anything short of this is sin.

Today I encourage you to stop and look in the mirror. Take a good, hard, long look at yourself. Now, go find someone that looks completely different and tell them you love them. Tell them God loves them and Jesus died for their sins just as He did for yours. Then invite them to church. Because at the end of the day, “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus.” (Romans 3:23-34 ESV).

“Behold, how good and pleasant it is when brothers dwell in unity!” (Psalm 133:1).



Chocolate Santa

There is a huge, half-eaten, chocolate Santa Claus in our kitchen cabinet left over from Christmas. It still tastes amazing, I know this because every so often I walk into the kitchen and break a piece off. I’ve also been reading through Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s “The Cost of Discipleship” again. If you haven’t read it, you should. In the second section of the book he talks about Jesus’ sermon on the mound from Matthew 5.

“Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.” (Matt. 5:6 ESV).

As I thought about hunger, the chocolate Santa came to mind. Many times instead of making a meal to satisfy my hunger I would just eat part of the Santa. I would fill up on junk food instead of getting proper nutrition. Then I thought about how often I tend to do the same thing in my spiritual life. Instead of feeding my spirit the bread of life that is Jesus Christ, I fill up on junk the world offers. How many times have I scrolled mindlessly through social media instead of spending time in God’s word? How many hours have I spent playing video games instead of praying for opportunities to share the Good News? When was the last time I was truly hungry for God’s word?

“Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst.” John 6:35 ESV

The problem with filling up on a chocolate Santa instead of a home cooked meal, is it doesn’t satisfy for very long. I get hungry again and go back for more. I catch myself in the same cycle with social media, TV, and video games. I binge “eat” thinking it will bring me joy and I’m left unsatisfied. I’m left wanting more. So today I’m taking a stand, I’m throwing out the chocolate Santa. And I encourage you to do the same. Take a break from social media and spend some time in God’s word. Skip tonight’s episode of whatever show you watch and pray. Fast from spiritual “junk food” that leaves you unsatisfied, and fill up on Jesus.

Fish Shaped Tambourine

“But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.” Acts 1:8 ESV

When I think about mission work I usually envision people in a third world country building schools or providing medical aid to people. I envision people living in shacks and struggling to find fresh water. And yes, the occasional fish shaped tambourine. Yet, when I googled the biggest need in the mission field I was surprised at what I found. It wasn’t new buildings, fresh water, or medical aid. Several articles stated that the biggest and most neglected mission field wasn’t in some far away country, it was in our own back yard. Article after article, saying the same thing, we are doing an amazing job at providing a service and spreading the gospel “to the end of the earth,” but have forgotten our neighbors.

One of the last things Jesus says in the book of Matthew is, “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations…” (Matt. 28:19). Yes, we are called to reach the world for Christ, but we can not forget about those in the world that live on the same street as us. We can’t forget about the part of the world that we work with or go to school with. In our effort to reach the ends of the earth, we should not forget about those on this earth that we see everyday, our friends and family, our neighbors.

We don’t have to jump on a plane and fly to some impoverished village to be a missionary, you just have to walk out your front door. As Christians, everywhere we go is a mission trip. Schools, the work place, the grocery store, these are our mission fields and we have been neglecting them.

“The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.” Matthew 9:37-38 ESV

This is my prayer, that we would take our mission field seriously. That we would realize we are God’s laborers in His harvest and approach our everyday lives with urgency in spreading the Gospel, not just at the ends of the earth but in our own cities and towns as well. That today, and everyday after, we would reach out to those that God has placed near to us and tell them about Jesus Christ.

Judge not…

“Judge not, that you be not judged.” Matthew 7:1 ESV


I have heard the saying, “Judge not, lest ye be judged,” a million times. Usually by non-Christians doing very non-Christian things. I’ve used it myself, before I was a Christian, whenever I would get called out for doing something I shouldn’t be doing. We use this verse to try and justify our actions or condemn those who don’t agree with our actions. If I’m honest, I really struggled with this verse for a while. We have one part of the bible saying to call out people in sin (1 Corinthians 5) and here we have Jesus saying not to judge people. So what do we do?

I think the root of this problem is our understanding of the word “judge.” We associate it with our opinion of someone when Jesus had a completely different idea in mind. We need to think of this type of “judging” as in a court room where a judge has the power to sentence you. Jesus is saying that we have no power or authority to cast judgment on a person in the sense of where they will spend eternity. In that case, yes, only God can judge you. BUT! That is not a pass to overlook sin.

If a brother or sister is caught in sin, we must deal with it. We must deal with it in love and gentleness. In the book of John, a woman is caught in the act of adultery and brought before Jesus for judgment.  She wasn’t rumored to be in adultery, she was CAUGHT in the VERY ACT of adultery. In this moment, the group of “religious” people surrounding her were ready to literally throw stones at her. But what does Jesus say? Jesus says in John 8:7, “Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” Jesus knew that we are all guilty and deserving of this punishment. After the crowd leaves, Jesus looks at the woman and says, “Where are they? Has no one condemned you?” She says, “No one, Lord.” Then Jesus looks at her and says, “Neither do I; go and sin no more.” This is beautiful. This is grace. This is love. This is Jesus.

We are all guilty of sin. We are all the woman in this story, caught in the very act of (insert sin here). And just like this woman, Jesus looks at us and says, “I don’t condemn you.” But He also says, “Go, and from now on sin no more.” Jesus doesn’t give her a pass to sin, He gives her a command to repent. To turn from this lifestyle of adultery and live righteously. This same call applies to us as well.

The great thing about our God is that He doesn’t say to clean up our lives then follow Him, no, He says follow me and then we’ll clean this up together. We have a God who truly loves us. A God who is mighty and able. A God who still works everyday miracles in people’s lives. If you are caught in sin, I beg you, repent and turn to Jesus.

Tomb Raider

“And Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” He replied, “My name is Legion, for we are many.” Mark 5:9 ESV


When Jesus stepped out of His boat in the country of the Gerasenes, He was immediately met by a man that had been living in tombs. A man that the bible says had, “an unclean spirit” (Mark 5:2). This man had been crying out and cutting himself with stones (Mark 5:5). When the demon-possessed man seen Jesus, he fell to his knees and proclaimed Him, “Son of the Most High God”. After a short introduction, Jesus cast the demons out of the man, making him sane again.

While most of us have probably never been demon-possessed, some of us have been outcast. Much like the man living in tombs, some of us have been rejected, ostracized, an maybe even cut ourselves. Some of us live in a “tomb” of loneliness. But we don’t have to stay there. Jesus approaches each one of us with love and kindness. He wants a relationship with us. Jesus didn’t heal this man then give him a list of dos and don’ts. Jesus simply asked the man his name, healed him, and told him to go and tell his friends about all the Lord had done for him. This is what Jesus wants for each of us as well, to step out of our “tomb”, build a relationship with Him, and tell others about His great love.

If you’re reading this and struggling, living in your own personal “tomb,” dealing with things all on your own, I beg you, give Jesus a chance to know you. Allow Him to cast out your demons and heal you. God loves you.

“But you, O Lord, are a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.” Psalm 86:15 ESV




Fall So Hard

“So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise, she took of its fruit and ate, and she also gave some to her husband who was with her, and he ate.” Genesis 3:6 ESV


The first sin, the fall of man. It was a dark day for mankind when Adam and Eve ate from the tree of knowledge. They were kicked out of Eden, Adam had to start working the fields, and Eve was promised painful childbirth. Not a very good start in my opinion. To cut Eve some slack, she was deceived by a creature who, “was more crafty than any other beast of the field,” Gen. 3:1. Nevertheless, they sinned. They chose to believe the lies of the enemy instead of the truth of God. Why? Why did Eve put her faith in the lies of the serpent instead of God’s truth? Yes, the serpent was crafty but I think it has more to do with how Eve viewed the tree. It says she, “saw that the tree was good for food,” and, “a delight to the eyes,” Gen. 3:6. Eve viewed the tree as a delight not as a means to death. She viewed it as pleasure instead of pain. God told her that if she ate, she would die. Yet, she eats.

Thousands of years later, we still commit the same sin. God tells us not to do something because it is sin and sin leads to death, but we do it anyway. We still choose the lies of the world, the lies of the devil, instead of God’s truth. We do it because it seems delightful or may bring us momentary pleasure but we are left with guilt, heartache, and pain. We have to change our perspective on sin. We put new labels on old sins to make it seem less lethal. We say things like, “I’m struggling with…” or “I messed up again.” We must call it what it is, sin. Don’t get me wrong, I have things that “I’m struggling with,” we all do. The bible says that we “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,” Romans 3:23. But we must call sin, sin. The good news is we don’t have to live in a continuous sin cycle, we can be free from the chains of sin.

So how do we break free? How do we escape slavery to sin?

We confess.

Romans 10:9 says, “Confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, YOU WILL BE SAVED.” This is how we are saved from eternal damnation, but how do we free ourselves from our sin cycle?

We confess.

James 5:16 says, “Confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be HEALED.”

We confess to God and we are saved, we confess to one another and we are healed. We are not meant to do this life alone, we need each other. We need people in our lives that we can confess our sins too. I’m not talking about someone you confess to and they say, “Yeah, me too buddy! Join the club.” I’m talking about Christian brothers and sisters that will hold us accountable to our sin. People that love us enough to tell us when we are wrong and to call out our sin.

The problem many face is that we don’t like to be called out. We don’t want people to know our dirty secrets. We fear the rejection of man more than the wrath of God. This too comes from a problem with our perspective on sin. If someone warned us that we were about to do something potentially deadly, like walk into traffic or jump out of a plane with no parachute, we would thank them for saving our lives. If someone calls out our sin we tell them to mind their own business. We must view sin as the poison it is and be thankful for the people that God has put in our lives to help us overcome it.

My prayer for you reader, is that if you are struggling with sin you would confess it and be free. You don’t have to live with that guilt and shame from some hidden sin anymore. Confess and you will be healed. Break free from the bondage that is sin.